Hating The Nationals

March 12, 2013

1010021647Remember the line in “Moneyball” about romance being an essential part of baseball? Well, so is hatred. You can’t be a good fan (a good “fanatic”) unless you are prepared to both love and hate passionately.

My love interest is the Washington Nationals. There are deep psychological reasons for this unshakable love that I’ve explored previously in this blog. My main hate interest is the New York Yankees. Not that I hate the Yanks’ players, coaches, or managers per se. What I hate is their business model, which boils down to buying everything they need the second they need it, out-bidding everyone else, and planning for years ahead to grab everyone else’s best players.

I’ve had other pet hatreds. I never hated the Phillies because they dominated the National League East for five years. What I hated was the horde of Phillies fans who invaded our ballpark in order to raise drunkenness and obnoxiousness to an art form. Additionally, I’ve started to hate my former love interest, the Baltimore Orioles. Again, it’s not the players or coaches; it’s the way their owner does business. Having lost his crusade to keep baseball out of D. C., he is now doing his best to deprive the Nationals of their fair share of the regional pie.

Widespread hatred for the Nationals is a new thing, but it’s growing. How have they sinned? I guess any bad team that improves faster than the experts predicted is bound to raise some ire. Two years of rock-bottom ineptitude enabled them to draft and sign two extraordinary players. Not only did the Nats improve with unseemly speed, they remained competitive in 2012 while shutting down their ace, Stephen Strasburg. This was a decision based on the best possible medical advice, as well as observations of his late-season struggles … a perfect no-brainer that for some reason arouses widespread outrage. How could a team be so brazen as to protect its future while playing in the present?

The rest of the league is detecting a fair amount of chutzpah among the Nationals. No question, last year’s rookie of the year, Bryce Harper, has a lot of it for a twenty-year old. Besides, manager Davey Johnson has declared that this season is his swan song, hinting that his players have extra motivation to send him off in glory.

The Nats were a sleeper team last year. After their first great season, largely unpredicted, since moving to D. C. eight years ago, the rest of Major League Baseball is gunning for them in underhanded ways. Predictions for their 2013 season are so overblown that almost any result short of a World Series championship will be declared a disappointment. The baseball gods will surely punish the overconfidence that everyone else attributes to this team. Who knows, maybe we’ll acquire our very own curse, more persistent than the one the Bambino inflicted on Boston for so long. That would amuse baseball fans everywhere … but not us.